Windsor Longboard

deckclamping2.jpg

clamping the deck’s laminates over a contoured armature for camber

I made good progress with my longboard skatedeck experiment. I built a clamping armature with a gradual contour to give the deck adequate camber, over-compensating slightly for the inevitable ‘springback’. I reversed the camber at the tail of the deck to lift the rear of the board to clear the ground and for leverage to spin the skateboard or brake its motion if necessary. I call this a ‘rooster tail’, although it functions more like a ‘chicken tail’. I’ve always followed the adage from boatbuilding that every design feature should serve at least three functions; the third feature here is really yet to be determined, but should be revealed with some test riding.

deck1.jpg

deckform1.jpg

deck camber/clamping armature; cured deck, ready for shaping (above)

I was surprised and delighted to see the glue oozing through the pours on the exposed surface of the upper deck, indicating deep penetration. While I worked on the Windsor Longboard in the shop, I boiled two chickens on the stove of my shop kitchen (every workshop needs one) in preparation for making tamales for our monthly ‘dinner club’ with four other nearby families. I love cooking this way, when it’s an extension of other tasks at hand.

The next day, I waited until all of the kids arrived for our group dinner before removing the cured deck from the armature, wanting them to help remove the clamps and see the process. The deck came off of the form beautifully, with very little ‘springback’. The kids approved of the shape and agreed to help test it when complete.

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