{ Category Archives: project dispatches }

Miss Clamdigger, Part 1

Lines drawings for Miss Clamdigger ( aka Sprite), designed by Atkin & Co

I invented a motto when I started out as an artist that continues to inform most everything I do or make: All vessels originate with an imagined voyage. The motto flows naturally from my lifelong obsession with wooden boats, whose deep history and continually evolving technology are foundational to my development as a craftsman, regardless of the material or context at hand. Continue Reading »

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Procedural Style: Parametric Emergence, Part 1

Wowhaus grew out of our ongoing conversations, beginning when we met in 1988

Ene and I never thought of Wowhaus as a style. We always framed it more as a way of life. But over the years as we’ve realized such a broad range of projects in such wide-ranging media and locales, a kind of style is beginning to emerge. Continue Reading »

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Makkeweks Final Inspection

makkeweks bronze

Earlier this week I met with the City of Oakland for the final inspection of our Makkeweks sculpture prior to installation. Installation is delayed until mid-2017 pending completion of Snow Park but the foundry completed the fabrication of the bronze castings and the sculpture’s interior, stainless steel armature in anticipation of temporarily storing the monster in their sculpture garden. The foundry treated the surface of the sculpture with chemicals to darken the bronze and accelerate its patina, which will continue to gain character with exposure to the elements over the next year.

 

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Scuppernong Commons

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Wowhaus were Artplace Environmenal Artists-in-Residence at the McColl Center for Art and Innovation in Charlotte, North Carolina in late winter of 2015. While in residence we realized an ambitious public project called Scuppernong Commons. The project is sited within Brightwalk, a mixed-income, mixed-use residential development that is a model of sustainable revitalization and economic development for the City.

Part architectural intervention, part social sculpture, Scuppernong Commons reintroduces the scuppernong grape to the urban fabric, and invites new traditions around the grape’s harvest, preparation and stewardship. Native to the Southeast, the scuppernong has been in cultivation since the 16th century and has been a common staple in homemade jams and jellies, juices, pies and wine.

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Scuppernong Commons consists of a walk-through arbor with overhead trellis, and poured concrete hardscape to support seasonal celebrations. In anticipation of a craft-based, community-engaged fabrication process, we designed a structural system that features a single repeating element, while allowing for randomness and variability. Twelve columns support the trellis and make an artificial allée. Each column is composed of 14 dry-stacked, pigmented concrete rings that were hand-packed with the help of volunteers from the community. The rust-red tone and claylike texture of the stacked columns evokes the region’s red clay soils.

As Charlotte continues to grow and prosper as a major hub of the New South, Scuppernong Commons is intended as a durable, loving tribute to the City’s humble origins, emblemized by the versatility and resiliency of its native fruit.

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Spinnradl Video

Spinnradl Video, shot and edited by J Miles Wolf

Here is a short video showing our Spinnradl sculptures in action in Cincinnati. The video features two songs on two nearly identical sculptures, sited about a block apart from each other along Pendleton Street. The songs are played by turning a crank, which spins a large cylinder that triggers an analog music box. Turning the crank also powers a pulsing, radial Moire animation on either end of the sculpture’s housing. Each song lasts about thirty seconds when spun at the optimal speed, and repeats as long as the crank is continually turned.

The first song featured is a German folk dance called Spinnradl (spinning wheel), where dancers traditionally make star patterns in groups of three. The song would have been familiar to the German immigrants who built the Pendleton neighborhood and lived and worked there in the 19th and early 20th Centuries. The second song is a ragtime composed in Cincinnati during the height of ragtime’s popularity. The song was composed to play on board steamboats that ferried passengers along a canal that once bordered the ‘Over-the Rhine’ neighborhood.

To learn more about the development of Spinnradl, please click here and scroll down.

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New Wowhaus Website

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I am very proud to announce that after 15 years we have designed a new website for Wowhaus. Perhaps the most remarkable thing is how well the site we built in 1999 has held up over the years, hence the delay and hesitation: ‘if it ain’t broke don’t fix it?’ Right?

Because we had actualized so little work as the artist team of Wowhaus when we designed the original site in the late 90’s, we arranged things chronologically in anticipation of the career arc we anticipated, scrollable like a ‘blog, but long before ‘blogs even existed. This became cumbersome after over 15 years of collated projects. Also, the platforms we used to design and maintain the website became obsolete, and our systems manager moved to South Africa.

Our new site is more like a collage, featuring projects more visually up front, all part of the same conceptual thrust regardless of their origin, location or timeframe. Projects are arranged visually, with no particular hierarchy, and are more randomly accessible. Closer inspection reveals the divergent details. We will continue to add content as our current projects are installed and documented.

While refining the text and going through our image archives for the new site, I realized that we never really take pause to reflect on the work we’ve accomplished as a whole. Seeing the completed website for the first time gave me a rare perspective of an outsider looking in, and I found a fresh perspective on what we actually do.

It occurred to me that Wowhaus projects are an extension of our domestic life- a glimpse of what the world might look like if a family decides to rebuild it as an extension of home, claiming public space for the kinds of use patterns that might normally be associated with home, with raising a family, building a community; recasting the world as an extension of home, as both a critique and a proposal.

Click here to see the new Wowhaus website.

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Making Molds of Makkeweks

makkeweks molds1Garrett McLean makes molds of Makkeweks at Berkeley’s Artworks Foundry

I hadn’t realized how attached I had become to the Makkeweks until we took her apart and loaded her up on a flatbed for delivery to Berkeley. The studio seemed suddenly huge and empty, and the sculpture looked kind of sad and nervous on the back of the truck. Moving her was nerve wracking for me too. I had designed the sculpture to break down, and engineered an armature to retain the shape in transit,  but did not know how compressed cork would hold up under the stress of backroads bumps and highway vibration.

makkeweks molds2The underside of the head was the first part of the sculpture to receive molds.

The sculpture survived the journey to Artworks Foundry unharmed, and I immediately set to making final adjustments to the shape and texture. The foundry wasted no time making molds, carefully marking alignments, planning part lines, and cutting the cork pattern into manageable sections. After about a week working on site, we passed final approval with the City of Oakland, and left Makkeweks to be cast in bronze.

To read more about the development of Makkeweks for the City of Oakland, please click here and scroll down.

 

 

 

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